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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Ten years ago, Kayzel Sangalang was living in the Philippines and wondering where her next meal would come from.

"I remember not having food in my house," she said.

Her parents had left for the U.S. years earlier, leaving behind their children as they tried to build a better life.

"They came [to New York] when I was 7. It was hard for my siblings. They were only like 2 and 1 at the time," she said.

Then, one day, the call came: Sangalang and her siblings would be reuniting with their parents in New York City.

"I remember it like it was yesterday. It was Dec. 12, 2007," she recalled. "We came here. It was cold -- we never experienced cold -- and two days later, we experienced snow. It was like the most amazing thing ever!"

But the transition wasn't easy. Sangalang was a high school student at the time and did not speak English.

"I had to learn by like watching TV," said Sangalang, who's now pursuing a marketing degree. "I'm thankful every day that I'm here in America."

This Thanksgiving season, few people have adopted holiday traditions more proudly -- and have more to be thankful for -- than immigrant communities.

In the diverse borough of Queens, New York, 48 percent of residents were born in another country and many of them are starting the journey to citizenship.

Several times a year, City University of New York goes into neighborhoods and puts out a call to neighbors: If you're eligible for citizenship, today's the day. The program is called CUNY Citizenship Now.

"We actually give them an appointment so they know what to bring," said CUNY Now's Monique Francis. "If they come prepared with a green card, a passport, the basic documents, we can actually take them in."

The New York Historical Society is one of several groups partnering with CUNY Citizenship Now to help immigrants navigate the road ahead. There are language tutors, lawyers and volunteers who are mostly immigrants themselves.

"Doing these events, it's amazing, like you just don't expect to hear the stories that you do, some of them really sad, some of them very hopeful," Francis said.

Mary Louise Charles of Dominica said she'd been in the U.S. for five years, the minimum required to be eligible.

"As the oldest and the person who's here and doing much better than my people [back] home, it is my priority to look back and pull up the rest," she said. "A lot of my people are without homes, without food, without clothing. ... Life in Dominica was very hard."

During Hurricane Maria, entire neighborhoods in Dominica were wiped off the map. The island's agriculture sector was destroyed. Even the prime minister had to bunk with friends after the roof of his home was torn off during the storm.

Charles, whose next step is taking the citizenship test, said she looked forward to celebrating Thanksgiving.

"The amount of food and family and friends, just the whole experience of it, I loved it," she said. "It's one of my favorite holidays right now."

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Garland Miller(WASHINGTON) -- Garland Miller has spent her career crunching numbers.

Her successful bookkeeping company handles clients across Washington, D.C., including a woman who made custom clothes for disabled war veterans.

One day, Miller asked whether she could offer the veterans some extra cash to help them get back on their feet.

"I asked her, 'What if I start giving one person $500' -- and this was me individually -- and she said, 'No, give money to five people, $100.' And I go '$100? We throw away $100.' And she said, 'No, that means a lot to them.' So I started giving money personally. And I started getting these wonderful letters thanking me and [sharing] how it changed their life," Miller said.

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She said that one such letter had told her how the recipient had been able to bring their father up on a bus to visit them because they didn't have any money.

"So one day I was on a walk and [it] just came to me: I could start a foundation," Miller said.

So, she did and she called it the Combat Soldiers Recovery Fund. She got help from her lawyer, graphic artist and webmaster clients, who all provided their expertise and training free of charge.

The recovery fund uses none of its donations to run the charity, which Miller said was unheard of. Miller also said the donations had all come from word of mouth.

"From there, I said: 'Oh, I'll get $25,000.' And then I said, 'Oh, maybe I'll get $50,000.' And now it's grown that we've given out close to $900,000 to the wounded because we have no overhead," she said.

When Fleet Marine Force Corpsman Joey De Prisco returned home from war with a traumatic brain injury and very little money, his physical therapist told him about Miller's fund.

"She pulled out this little, nifty little card and she [his therapist] was like, 'Fill out this card and she'll send you a check. No questions asked,'" he said.

The father of twin sons in Annapolis, Maryland, said he got the check immediately.

"I was astonished," De Prisco said. "Every dollar literally went to baby supplies. We needed car seats. We needed everything."

More than 30,000 U.S. veterans returned home wounded in Iraq. Miller's fund wants to help all of them. It's an ambitious goal for a one-woman front office.

"We usually bring in between [$80,000] and $100,000 a year," she said. "My goal next year is to get to that million that we've given out to the wounded. Now that only covers maybe 3,500 wounded.

"There were 50,000 wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan and they're still getting wounded there," she added. "So I have a long way to go."

In Kansas City, Missouri, Sgt. Travis Stover received a $300 check when he reached his lowest point recovering from his war injuries.

"I just sort of lost all hope and was in a bad place," Stover said. "At the time, where I feel like I was kicked down in the trenches and nobody was there to help me out, there was a few people that gave their hand out and helped lift me out. ... The Combat Soldiers Recovery Fund was one of those organizations."

He said the few hundred dollars had made a difference in his life.

"Having your medical bills paid or whatever you spend that money on -- maybe enjoying a nice meal at McDonald's with your kids -- vets can't believe it," he said.

Miller said the foundation had changed her life.

"I realize I can't complain. All the people that I meet put me in a good mood," she said.

De Prisco now has a successful business that allows him to give back to the Combat Soldiers Recovery Fund. And, across the U.S., Stover has recovered and runs his own business.

"God bless her [Miller]. She donates all of her life and her time. I don't know where she gets all the energy because I don't even have that much energy," De Prisco said.

Miller said she hopes Americans check out Combat Soldiers Recovery Fund and consider donating.

"It is just a joy for me to do what I can do," she said.

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GoFundMe/Kate McClure(PHILADELPHIA) -- A young woman has raised over $160,000 for a homeless man who, she said, spent his last $20 to buy her gas after she became stranded on a major interstate.

On a fundraising page she has since set up for the man, Kate McClure, 27, wrote that she pulled off an exit ramp on I-95 near Philadelphia late one night when she realized her car was running out of gas.

A homeless man, Johnny Bobbitt, 34, spotted her vehicle and approached to offer her assistance, she said.

"Johnny sits on the side of the road every day, holding a sign. He saw me pull over and knew something was wrong," McClure wrote. "He told me to get back in the car and lock the doors. A few minutes later, he comes back with a red gas can."

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Bobbitt, who McClure said she later learned is a Marine Corps veteran and a former firefighter, had used his last $20 to buy her gas. Wanting to repay him for his kindness, she started a GoFundMe page to share the story and raise funds for him.

She has since taken him essentials to stay warm and repaid him for the gas, and her GoFundMe page has raised more than $160,000 — far more than her $10,000 goal. She wrote that she would like to use the funds to help him rent an apartment, get a reliable vehicle and cover four to six months' worth of expenses.

Neither McClure nor Bobbitt immediately responded to ABC News' request for comment.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Perhaps the most daunting thing about Thanksgiving is not navigating the travel, the traffic or the mountains of food, but rather navigating the dinner conversation while keeping the peace.

"Remember that you can endure just about anything for one day, and that includes uncomfortable family settings," Sharon Schweitzer, founder of Protocol & Etiquette Worldwide, told ABC News. "Keep your head high and let any annoyances roll off your back rather than letting them provoke you into an argument."

She added, "If possible, seat yourself with family with whom you can share a pleasant conversation without unwanted interjections, and focus on enjoying the celebrations rather than avoiding particular people."

Schweitzer shared with ABC News her expert tips for keeping the peace at the holiday dinner table:

Play it safe


Stick with neutral conversational starters that won’t provoke a heated debate, such as sports, movies or upcoming holiday plans, Schweitzer suggests. "When you steer clear of hot topics such as politics or religion, you reduce the risk of clashing opinions. If someone brings up a sensitive subject at the table, politely change the topic or offer a gentle but firm conversational closer. Try saying something along the lines of, 'That’s an interesting point, but in the spirit of the holiday, let’s avoid discussing that at the table.

Select seats carefully


"If you’re hosting the event, consider a seating arrangement to avoid age-old disputes between Cousin Nancy and Uncle Ned,” she said. “Seat guests in conflict on opposite ends of the table, and place yourself near the center so that you can mediate the conversation if needed."

Schweitzer also suggested keeping "taboo topics" off the table this holiday season. These include:

Politics: "Political conversations are infamous for disrupting the peace at family dinners and family gatherings," she said. "For those with strong opinions, remember there is a time and place for everything. Adulting includes knowing when and what boundaries to respect. This includes refraining from bringing up politics, especially for the sake of peace, the host and the event.”

Prying Questions: "While you may mean well by asking when your niece is planning to have children, or inquiring about someone’s relationship status, personal questions push all the wrong buttons," Schweitzer said. Avoid these kinds of questions and instead ask about their hobbies, their new job or their holiday plans.

Religion: "Like politics, religion can stir up strong beliefs and cause disputes among family members of different faiths or philosophies. If you know you’re hosting guests with varying belief systems, avoid aggravating any tension by asking about the last time they went to church."

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iStock/Thinkstock(YELLVILLE, Ark.) -- Two turkeys that were treated inhumanely just a few weeks ago now have a safe home for the holiday.

At the Turkey Trot in Yellville, Arkansas, held annually in mid-October, several turkeys were thrown from a plane and a rooftop, according to local media reports.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that "several live turkeys were tossed from an airplane." The article went on to add that "turkeys were released from the Marion County Courthouse" roof as well. For more than 50 years, the turkey drops have occurred during the annual Yellville Turkey Trot festival, according to the Democrat-Gazette. The practice has been met with opposition from animal activist groups.

Neither the Yellville Chamber of Commerce, the organizer of the Turkey Trot event, nor officials from the Marion County Courthouse responded to ABC News' repeated requests for comment.

For two of the turkeys, there will be a happy ending. The Farm Sanctuary, in Southport, Connecticut, will be their new home.

"The two turkeys, named John and Ringo, are part of a quartet of birds dubbed the 'Fab Four' who were rescued after being found injured and bleeding on the pavement," Meredith Turner-Smith, a spokesperson for the Farm Sanctuary, told ABC News. "The turkeys were [initially] brought to Farm Sanctuary’s shelter in upstate New York, where they received urgent medical care for their injuries. Two [other] birds, Paul and George, are still healing from their wounds."

According to Turner-Smith, domesticated turkeys can only fly short distances, so many die upon impact and broken wings are common.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) --  The majority of the nation will be enjoying a quiet and tranquil Thanksgiving with sunshine spreading across nearly the entire nation -- including the Southwest, the Great Plains, the Midwest, a large portion of the Ohio Valley and the major I-95 corridor cities in the Northeast.

 This quiet weather pattern across a large portion of the nation is actually notable -- this time of year can be quite turbulent with significant winter storm threats.

There are only a couple of notable weather headlines to highlight including record heat in the Southwest, cold in the Northeast and more rain for the Northwest.

Bitter wind chills

In the Northeast, it will be a seasonably chilly start to Thanksgiving. For those heading out to events on Thanksgiving morning it will feel like the 20s in many of the Northeast cities.

It will also be quite chilly in parts of the south this morning with wind chills in the 20s all the way down to Alabama and Mississippi.

Broiling hot Thanksgiving

A warm and mild weather pattern is bringing hot temperatures to parts of the Southwest.

Notable records from Wednesday:

Los Angeles - 93 degrees F (Previous 89 degrees F in 1950)

Long Beach Airport, Calif. - 96 degrees F (Previous 88 degrees F in 2015)

Palm Springs, Calif. - 96 Degrees F (Previous 93 degrees F in 1933)

El Cajon, Calif. - 98 degrees F (Previous 92 degrees F in 2002)

Anaheim, California was the hottest location in the nation on Wednesday, with a high temperature of 100 degrees.

The mild weather has also been stretching north and east into the mountains and Pacific Northwest. It was nearly 70 degrees in Seattle on Wednesday.

 It will be in the upper 80s Thursday across the Arizona deserts, and in the 90s in parts of Southern California. Downtown Los Angeles is forecast to be 90 degrees Thursday. It will be one of the warmest Thanksgivings on record in Southern California. Several daily records will be possible, including Phoenix and Los Angeles.

The heat will slowly ease through the holiday weekend, with the chance for records diminishing each day.

Northwest storm moving in

Heavy rains over the past few days in the Seattle area will continue on Thursday.

First responders rescued a few people in Snohomish County, Washington on Wednesday as flood waters stranded some drivers on roads in the county. Some rivers remain in minor to moderate flood stage Thanksgiving morning due to excessive rain over the past few days.

Another system is moving into the Northwest Thursday morning and it will bring more rain to parts of Washington, Oregon and Northern California. Area river flooding is possible through the next few days as an additional 1 to 3 inches of rain is expected. A flood watch remains in effect for parts of the region through Thanksgiving afternoon. There is an isolated threat of landslides in the region due to saturated soils.

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Kate McClure(NEW YORK) -- A young woman has raised over $160,000 for a homeless man she said spent his last $20 to buy her gas after she became stranded on a major interstate.

On a fundraising page she has since set up for the man, Kate McClure, 27, wrote that she pulled off an exit ramp on I-95 near Philadelphia late one night when she realized her car was running out of gas.

A homeless man, Johnny Bobbitt, 34, spotted her vehicle and approached to offer her assistance, she said.

"Johnny sits on the side of the road every day, holding a sign. He saw me pull over and knew something was wrong," McClure wrote. "He told me to get back in the car and lock the doors. A few minutes later, he comes back with a red gas can."

Bobbitt, who McClure said she later learned is a Marine Corps veteran and a former firefighter, had used his last $20 to buy her gas. Wanting to repay him for his kindness, McClure started a GoFundMe page to share the story and raise funds for Bobbitt.

In addition to bringing him essentials to stay warm and repaying him for the gas, McClure's page has raised more than $160,000 in donations, far more than her $10,000 goal. McClure wrote that she would like to use the funds to help him with rent an apartment, get a reliable vehicle and cover four to six months worth of expenses.

Neither McClure nor Bobbitt immediately responded to ABC News' request for comment.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- As the investigation into the murder of Baltimore Police Det. Sean Suiter continues, it was revealed during a press conference held by Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis on Wednesday evening that Suiter was shot with his own gun and the detective was set to testify in a police corruption case the next day.

Suiter was gunned down on Nov. 15 in West Baltimore while conducting a follow-up on a homicide investigation. The 18-year veteran officer sustained a close-contact gunshot wound to the head.

During Wednesday evening’s press conference, Davis confirmed that Suiter’s was set to testify in an unspecified case against officers who were indicted in March. Davis noted that the U.S. attorney's office and the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Baltimore field office assured him that Suiter was not a target in any ongoing criminal investigation.

"There is no information that has been communicated to me that Det. Suiter was anything other than a stellar detective, great friend, loving husband and dedicated father," Davis said.

Davis also revealed in Wednesday's press conference that Suiter was killed with his own gun.

Evidence found on the detective's clothing, in addition to body camera footage, indicates that there was a struggle between the officer and his killer, authorities said.

On the night of the incident there was a radio transmission by Suiter that lasted only a few seconds before he was killed indicating he was in distress, Davis said. Also, Suiters’ partner was confirmed to be nearby when the incident happened and can be seen on private surveillance video calling for help.

Davis said despite the timing of the shooting one night before Suiter was set to testify, the evidence does not indicate any conspiracy. Police believe the original motive is accurate -- the officers approached a suspicious individual when the struggle ensued and Suiter was shot.

Baltimore police still do not have a clear description of the suspect, other than that of an African-American man wearing a black coat with a white stripe.

"We will continue to follow the evidence in this very important case. ... I owe it to the Suiter family and the BPD to pursue every investigative lead and to examine every piece of evidence to determine exactly what happened," Davis said.

The reward for information leading to an arrest has grown to $215,000.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Attorney General Jeff Sessions has ordered a comprehensive review of the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) in the wake of the shooting at a church in Sutherland Spring, Texas, which killed 26 people, including an unborn child police have included in the total.

“The recent shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas revealed that relevant information may not be getting reported to the NICS –- this is alarming and it is unacceptable," Sessions said in a statement.

The shooter in that case, Devin Kelley, should have been prevented from purchasing a gun, based on his conviction in a military court. That criminal information did not appear in his criminal background check when he purchased four guns over a four-year period, including the AR-556 rifle used in the deadly church massacre.

The Pentagon's inspector general is also conducting a review of why those records were not part of one of the federal criminal database used to keep firearms out of the hands of prohibited purchasers.

"I am directing the FBI and ATF to do a comprehensive review of the NICS and report back to me the steps we can take to ensure that those who are prohibited from purchasing firearms are prevented from doing so,” Sessions said.

Sessions is ordering the agencies to work with the Department of Defense to identify and resolve any issues the military may have with reporting convictions to the NICS system. The review will also identify others federal agencies that may not be fully and accurately reporting information into the system.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and FBI will also conduct a review of ATF Form 4473 and recommend changes as necessary. This is the form that people who purchase guns from federally licensed firearms dealer must fill out before a criminal background check is conducted.

Kelley was court-martialed in 2012 while a member of the Air Force on charges of assault on his spouse and their child. He received a bad conduct discharge, confinement for 12 months and a reduction of his military status. Kelley was killed by an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound after fleeing the church shooting.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The FBI is investigating the injuries that left one Border Patrol agent dead and another severely injured as a "potential assault," officials said.

The agents had been discovered at the bottom of a ravine in Texas after they had responded to a sensor triggered in the area, law enforcement sources told ABC News.

On Monday, authorities were open to the possibility that the two agents had inadvertently slipped into the ravine because of a lack of concrete evidence, the sources said.

During a press conference on Tuesday, the FBI Special Agent-in-Charge Emerson Buie, Jr. said it was investigating the case as a "potential assault on federal officers" and appealed to the public to call in with any tips.

The unnamed injured agent was released Wednesday afternoon from University Medical Center in El Paso, according to a hospital spokesperson.

The reward for information has been raised to $25,000, officials said.

President Donald Trump said Monday that the agents had been "brutally attacked." When asked if Trump was correct in the description, Buie said that he had not briefed the president on the case.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott also referred to the injuries the agents sustained as an "attack."

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iStock/Thinkstock(WEST CHESTER, Pa.) -- Officials on Wednesday located the two remaining victims of a massive fire that burned down a senior living community last Thursday, claiming the lives of four residents.

The victims were discovered in the rubble of the building.

Authorities discovered the first victim of the Barclays Friends Senior Living Community fire in West Chester, Pennsylvania early Tuesday morning. The second victim was found Tuesday afternoon.

Recovery efforts continued Wednesday in the south wing where investigators believe the fire started, and that is where the remaining two victims were found, authorities said.

None of the victims have been identified by name, but authorities have said the four missing residents included a husband and wife ages 89 and 92, an 85-year-old woman and a 93-year-old woman.

The families of all four have been notified.

"The thoughts and prayers of the men and women of ATF are with the families of the victims during this difficult time. Their losses only strengthen our resolve to provide answers to them as a result of our investigation of this tragedy," said Special Agent in Charge Donald Robinson.

Both the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the Chester County Fire Department are continuing to investigate the origin and cause of the five-alarm fire. Cranes and excavating equipment have been brought to the scene to remove large masses of debris.

There were 152 people in the building when the blaze erupted on Thursday at 10:30 p.m. ET. Hundreds of first responders used beds and wheelchairs to evacuate elderly residents. The fire continued burning into the next day and was contained Friday afternoon.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SAN Bruno, Calif.) -- YouTube has announced a plan to implement stricter controls on videos that show child endangerment.

The move, announced on Wednesday, comes after a BuzzFeed article exposed videos of children in “disturbing and abusive situations,” some of which had racked up millions of views.

YouTube says it implemented new guidelines to remove content that features the endangerment of a child, even if that’s not what the uploader intended.

In a post on the company’s official blog, the company's vice president of product management, Johanna Wright, said YouTube had shut down more than 50 channels and removed thousands of videos that don’t fit under the new, stricter guidelines in the past week.

YouTube also says it will block inappropriate comments on videos that feature minors by using a combination of automated and human flagging.

The company also announced the creation of a platform for family friendly content, called YouTube Kids, but didn't give a timeline for when it would be available.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The discovery of additional remains of Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four soldiers killed in an October ambush in Niger, drew renewed attention to the process of how the military transports the remains of deceased service members back to the United States and releases them to their family.

On Tuesday, a Defense Department spokesperson told ABC News that additional remains were discovered on Nov. 12 in the same location in which his body was originally discovered two days after the Oct. 4 ambush.

In instances in which additional remains may be identified, the family of the deceased service member elects beforehand whether they wish to be notified, according to a spokesperson for Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

As is the case with the original remains, they are transferred to Dover and the family is given the choice of how they want to receive them, if at all.

Johnson's family had been notified about the discovery, the Defense Department said Tuesday.

Myeshia Johnson, Sgt. Johnson's widow, claimed in October that she was prevented from viewing her late husband's remains.

"Every time I asked to see my husband, they wouldn't let me," Myeshia Johnson said in an Oct. 23 interview on "Good Morning America." At the time, a Dover mortuary affairs spokesperson said that families cannot view remains at the base but are free to do so when they are released to the family.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, North Carolina) -- The rush is on at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in North Carolina to get passengers into the air and on to their Thanksgiving plans.

The airport is the ninth busiest in the United States and the second biggest hub for American Airlines. Airport officials there are expecting to serve more than 130,000 passengers on Wednesday alone.

Nationwide, TSA plans to screen more than 26 million passengers and crew at airport checkpoints, a 5 percent increase over last year.

Many airline employees like pilots, flight attendants and gate agents are regularly seen by fliers, but there are others who are working equally hard over the holiday: baggage and cargo handlers, mechanics and cleaners.

"Everything has to be done in 120 minutes, otherwise we don't make our time," said Frank Fracsa, a maintenance worker for American Airlines.

If you look outside at the baggage handlers, you might witness a rarely seen exercise.

These men and women regularly gather to stretch, and are sometimes joined by an on-site physical therapist.

"It does make a difference," said Laura Sabatino, a physical therapist at the airport. "Nobody realizes how physical the jobs in the airport industry are. I mean, they're lifting over and over all day."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The travel forecast across much of the country for one of the busiest travel days of the year will be quiet with minimal travel disruptions on the road and in the air.

The main trouble spot will be in the Pacific Northwest, where several storms have brought heavy rain to the area this week. It will continue Wednesday with possible flooding and flight delays.

Anyone traveling early Wednesday morning in the Northeast could face some issues, with snow for the interior areas and rain showers from New York City to Boston. However, it will clear out by the afternoon.

Elsewhere, the rest of the country will be mostly sunny and dry with easy travel weather.

Wet early in Northeast

A cold front is making its way into the Northeast Wednesday with colder air behind the front and milder air ahead of it.

The cold air is creating light snow for parts of Pennsylvania and western New York early Wednesday morning, and that will move into interior New England later. Any snow should be confined to northern interior Maine by the afternoon.

ABC meteorologists are also tracking the rain ahead of the front with some heavy showers happening in eastern North Carolina -- mainly the Outer Banks -- and moving up the coast through Wednesday morning.

Washington D.C. should stay mostly dry, with some light rain anticipated for New York City between 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Then rain moves into Boston, lingering there through the early afternoon. Overall, this could bring minor travel impacts to the area Wednesday morning.

Cold weather coming next

Behind that front is another cold blast. Although widespread record lows are not expected, wind chills will still be quite cold for the Midwest Wednesday morning and the Northeast by Thanksgiving morning.

Wind chills are in the teens and even single digits across the Midwest early Wednesday, and it feels like only 15 degrees in Chicago and 9 degrees in Minneapolis.

By Thursday, morning wind chills will be in the 20s from New York City to Boston.

It will be cold for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, but winds look light with lots of sunshine.

Northwest continues to see rain

A flood watch remains in effect for northwest Washington, including Seattle, Wednesday through Thursday afternoon.

Rainfall totals of 2 to 5 inches have already fallen, and an additional 1 to 3 inches is possible, with storm totals of over 7 inches of rain this week.

Due to all the rain from these storms, minor flooding is possible for rivers in the area. The rain will also bring slick and wet roads for travelers.

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LOCAL NEWS

News Headlines for Thurs., Nov. 23, 2017

Sherman woman killed in hunting accident in town of Sherman... A Sherman woman is dead following a hunting accident Wednesday afternoon on Armenian Road in the town of Sherman.  Sheriff...

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