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Airbnb, Inc.(NEW YORK) -- France is on track to slap serious penalties on hosts and platforms for illegal short-term rentals including Airbnb or HomeAway, the latest salvo between a major city struggling to fight the unregulated industry of renting out private homes.

French President Emmanuel Macron is poised to sign the act into law on Friday, which would impose penalties up to 5,000 euros for hosts and 12,500 for companies who operate home rentals without a government-issued license. For rentals that operate illegally for more than 120 days, fines would be 10,000 euros for hosts and 50,000 for companies.

Paris is important because it is Airbnb's biggest market with about 60,000 listings.

It's unclear whether the new law would affect listings in Paris this holiday season.

The new French law was discussed at ReformBnB, the first global conference to take on best practices in regulating the increasing number of home-sharing businesses like Airbnb or Booking.com in New York City on Sunday and Monday. Hotel industry representatives, economists, analysts and public officials from more than 20 countries and 30 cities attended.

Airbnb responded by hiring an LED truck that played a video ad and which was parked on the same city block as the conference hotel.

The ad, which played on a loop, featured ordinary looking people holding up placards that said: "The big hotel industry made $77 billion last year. While taking over $5 billion in tax subsidies. So ... we subsidize the big hotels record profits. But we can't earn extra money on Airbnb?" It ended with the statement: Paid for by Airbnb.

There were also a couple dozen pro-Airbnb protestors who said they were hosts outside the hotel. Their signs echoed the language in the video ad word for word. Some of the hotel-industry executives stepped outside to be photographed with the protestors.

"Big hotels writing short-term rental policy is like big tobacco writing health policy -- it's just a bad idea and is ultimately bad for regular people," a company spokesperson said in an emailed statement.

Last week, Airbnb announced it had booked more than $1 billion in revenue in its third quarter as the company is well on its way to being one of the most-watched initial public offerings next year.

However, the Silicon Valley-based company is tussling with many of the municipalities in which it operates over increased regulations. It has filed several lawsuits to avoid handing over data about who uses the platform to governments. Opposition to short-term rentals, as the practice is called, has created a network of strange bedfellows, including city officials, hotel owners and operators, and rent-control advocates in cities disrupted by these companies.

Critics said that because private home rentals are unregulated, the areas in which these companies operate are robbed of taxes, are more vulnerable to crime and public disturbances, and could house nefarious behavior ranging from noise complaints to drug activity and prostitution or human trafficking.

Earlier this year, New York City comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that said Airbnb was responsible for nearly 10 percent of rent increases throughout New York City between 2009 and 2016. Tenants in Murray Hill, Gramercy, Stuyvesant Town, Williamsburg and Greenpoint paid monthly increases of more than $100 due to Airbnb listings in that time period, according to the report.

"Their business model had a direct impact on our affordability housing crisis," Stringer told attendees. "Right after we issued our report, the company put the propaganda machine to work. They started on personal attacks. Airbnb spent like $1 million on TV ads blasting me and my office ... in New York City, we do the right thing and stand up to bullies."

At the time, the company issued a statement that said: "Our message to Comptroller Stringer and his hotel industry allies is loud and clear: Rather than attacking the nearly 50,000 middle-class families who rely on Airbnb, it's time to work with us to help New Yorkers stay in their homes. We look forward to continually making this point over the next few weeks."

New York City, Airbnb's second-biggest market with about 50,000 listings, is a constant battleground for parties fighting encroachment. Next February, a new law requiring platforms to hand over information about every short-term rental in the city is scheduled to go into effect. Airbnb and other sites had sued the city in federal court in Manhattan to prevent the law from taking effect.

In the meantime, New York has cracked down on violations -- last month The Atelier, a 46-story luxury apartment building in Manhattan, received 27 notices of violations for illegal hotel operations in a raid, first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

In addition to the LED display truck, the organized protestors and the statement, Airbnb's head of Northeast policy Josh Meltzer wrote an op-ed titled "Time for a Truce: A Path Forward for Airbnb, The Hotel Industry & Home Sharing in New York."

"We are ready for a hard, honest discussion. Eager, in fact. Because our hosts -- real New York families -- are depending on us to have that discussion, to bring some resolution and security to their own lives and financial future. We want a solution," Meltzer wrote. "We are at our seats at the table, hand extended. And we hope the big hotel industry will join us."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Along with the electronics, clothing and big-box items people wait all year to buy on Black Friday, now's also the time to score big savings on travel.

The good news for fliers is that airfare sales will extend beyond Friday, and deals will be available on both Cyber Monday and the lesser-known Travel Tuesday.

In fact, this might be one time where the early bird doesn't get the deal. The airfare prediction site Hopper told ABC News' Good Morning America that it expects twice as many fare sales on Travel Deal Tuesday than on Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.

An analysis of historical flight pricing data found that fare sale activity significantly spiked on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, Hopper said. The site attributes this to travel demand declining following Thanksgiving. Most travelers have already booked their holiday airfare but haven't started planning winter getaways yet.

It's also worth checking out carriers that may be less familiar to travelers for the best Travel Tuesday deals. Among the airlines that have announced sales so far are Cathay Pacific, Icelandair, Philippine Airlines, South African Airways and Hawaiian Airlines.

For those willing to travel in the next few weeks, it's one of the cheapest times of the year, according to Rick Seaney, CEO of FareCompare.

In his latest column for GMA, he wrote, "This end-of-the-year cheap-flight zone is neatly sandwiched between Thanksgiving and Christmas, from about Nov. 27 or 28 until mid-December. It's those peaceful couple of weeks after turkey day travel ends, just before the Christmas rush."

But don't discount the more traditional Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales. Kayak told GMA that depending on where you're headed, fantastic fares can be found.

Far-flung destinations from the U.S. will offer the biggest bargains: Black Friday airfare to the South Pacific is down 26 percent while flights to South America and Africa are 9 and 7 percent cheaper, respectively.

If you don't save on the airfare, you may be able to make it up with hotel discounts.

Hopper said rates in major markets such as New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Miami may be 35 percent cheaper on Travel Tuesday.

In popular warm-weather destinations, standout savings of more than 50 percent can be found at The Sanctuary Cap Cana resort: Book from Nov. 21-27 and travel between Dec. 1-27.

Jewel Grande Montego Bay Resort & Spa in Jamaica is offering a Cyber Monday deal, featuring 54 percent off room rates. The deal applies to stays from Aug. 16, 2019, to Dec. 23, 2019.

Meliá Nassau Beach, Bahamas, is offering discounted room rates but travelers must book before Nov. 30 to get the deal.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The first official shopping day of the holiday season, Black Friday, is close at hand, and with it comes the headache of finding a parking spot at the mall.

Unless your local mall has MyPark robots. The devices can be deployed essentially with the swipe of an app: a couple extra bucks and the little devices spring up, blocking your spot until you arrive. When you do, the metal blocking bot folds back down, allowing you to park without fighting anybody for the same slab of pavement.

Forbes reports the breakthrough was the brainchild of Ricardo Blanco, a construction company owner who was sick and tired of people swiping his reserved spot. Eventually, app technology made his dream into a reality, and his company now has deals with Simon Property Group, the largest mall operator in the U.S., as well as Westfield, another big name in the business.

Parking space rental rates range between $1 and $3 for the first two hours with additional charges per hour thereafter, the magazine notes.  

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Most Americans can't get enough of that "new car smell" -- as proof, see the countless air fresheners that purport to restore it to your car as it ages.

But the coveted scent -- really a potpourri of new leather, plastic bonding material and other agents -- is offensive to customers in the world's largest car market: China.

"Unpleasant interior smell/odor remains the top industry problem in that market," said Brent Gruber, senior director, global automotive, at J.D. Power. "To put that in context, it is nearly double the problem rate of the second most prevalent problem, excessive fuel consumption."

Because of that, the Detroit Free Press reports that Ford has filed a patent for a process that will rid brand new cars of that new car smell, to make the vehicles more palatable to Chinese noses.

It's thought their patented process will seek to "bake" out the smell by exposing the interiors to higher temperatures: essentially accelerating what naturally occurs as your car ages. The "new car smell" fades as that combination of scents from the new car materials is exposed to the heat outside, inside as the interior sits under the sun, and is exposed to temperatures from the car's heater.
 
Last year, Ford sent "18 smell testers, or so-called 'Golden Noses'" to make sure their cars pass the smell test, the paper reports.

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Chipotle(NEW YORK) -- Fast-food giant Chipotle rehired a manager of one of its Minnesota franchises it had fired after she was recorded in a series of viral cellphone videos refusing to serve a group of young black men unless they paid first.

The restaurant chain said in a statement Monday that it reversed it's decision after it "spent the last few days reviewing the evidence available to us regarding the incident."

The company had earlier said it was aware that one of the alleged victims who claimed that he and his friends were racially profiled had previously boasted on Twitter about dine-and-dash incidents specifically targeting Chipotle.

"Based on our review, we have offered our manager her job back," Laurie Schalow, chief communications officer for Chipotle, said in a statement to ABC News Monday afternoon. "While our normal protocol was not followed serving these customers, we publicly apologize to our manager for being put in this position. We will work to continue to ensure that we support a respectful workplace for our employees and our customers alike."

The incident occurred on Thursday at a Chipotle on Grand Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota, when five young black men walked in about 4 p.m. and asked to be served.

In a video posted on Twitter Friday by one of the men, Masud Ali, 21, which garnered tens of thousands of likes and retweets, an unidentified female manager tells the group, "You gotta pay because you never have money when you come here."

The group begins yelling at the manager and other staffers that they are being "stereotyped." They continued to berate the manager and a staffer who asked them to calm down when a white customer who came in after them was served without being asked to pay up front.

"We're not going to make food unless you guys actually have money," a server said in the video.

After the video went viral on Twitter, Chipotle announced on Saturday that it had fired the manager and made the staff of the restaurant undergo "re-training to prevent this incident from happening again."

"Our policy is to treat our customers and employees fairly and with respect at all times and under any circumstances. We will work with all our restaurant teams to ensure they are prepared to handle situations of this kind and know they have our full support," Schalow said in her statement Monday. "We are committed to doing the right thing and acting in a manner consistent with a thoughtful, fact-driven approach."

But other Twitter users came the manager's defense, alerting Chipotle of the previous tweets allegedly posted by Ali in which he joked about dine-and-dash incidents at St. Paul restaurants, including Chipotle.

"Not dine and dash we're just borrowing the food for a couple of hours that's all," Ali allegedly quipped in one Tweet from July 2015.

In another tweet in March 2015, he allegedly wrote, "Dine and dash is forever interesting" and added three emojis of laughing and crying faces.

In January 2016, Ali tweeted: "aye man I think Chipotle catching up to us fam … should we change locations…"

The tweets have since been taken down, but Twitter users defending the manager posted screen grabs of them over the weekend.

Efforts by ABC News to reach Ali for comment Monday were unsuccessful.

"Our actions were based on the facts known to us immediately after the incident, including video footage, social media posts and conversations with the customer, manager, and our employees," Laurie Schalow, Chipotle's chief communications officer, said in an email to the St. Paul Pioneer Press newspaper.

Schalow said the company was aware of Ali's previous tweets before it fired the manager, but claimed "additional information" has prompted the company to investigate further and consider rehiring the manager. She declined to elaborate on the additional information the company received.

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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Federal prosecutors in New York charged French investment bank Societe Generale with conspiring to violate the Trading with the Enemy Act for processing billions of dollars in transactions for Cuban banks.

Societe Generale agreed to pay a $1.3 billion fine as part of a deferred prosecution agreement. The amount represents one of the largest penalties ever imposed on a financial institution for violating U.S. sanctions, according to federal prosecutors.

Between 2004 and 2010 prosecutors said Societe Generale arranged $13 billion in transactions that should have been rejected, blocked or stopped for investigation because of U.S. rules about trade with Cuba.

In a related action, the New York State Department of Financial Services fined Societe Generale $420 million for handling billions of dollars in illegal transactions with Cuba, Iran, Libya and Sudan.

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Hannah Bronfman at the Girlboss Rally. Cindy Ord/Getty Images for GirlBoss Rally NYC 2018(NEW YORK) -- Over a 1,000 women from 31 countries gathered in New York City this weekend for the GirlBoss Rally, a two-day women's career and networking conference organized by Sophia Amoruso's Girlboss platform.

The GirlBoss Rally featured panels on topics ranging from equal pay, building confidence and how to build a side hustle. Female leaders including Arianna Huffington, Brooklyn Decker, actress and co-founder of Finery, and Rent the Runway co-founder Jennifer Hyman, were on hand to answer questions. The goal: to galvanize a community of women in building their career dreams.

Amoruso founded GirlBoss in 2014 after experiencing her own failures at her first company Nasty Gal. The CEO always wanted to create a space for women within the community and provide resources to thrive professionally.

In January, the company is launching its own version of LinkedIn, built for millennial women to network and make connections.

GMA talked to Amoruso and panelists about the top career mistakes women make and how they can avoid the traps.

Top mistake women make in being a Girlboss: Sophia Amoruso, Founder and CEO, GirlBoss


“The biggest mistake is thinking our failures are somehow unique,” Amoruso told GMA. "If you’re not failing every day you’re not taking enough risks.”

Instead, Amoruso suggests, “Reach out, share your story. I’m trying to do that and we want that happening on every stage here and it makes us all feel so much less alone. So find other people and have honest conversations."

Top mistake women make in networking: Landit founder and CEO Lisa Skeete Tatum


Lisa Skeete Tatum's mission is to help women define success on their own terms and help them navigate the career landscape with her company, a technology platform called LandIt. While navigating a career, a lot of women make mistakes when it comes to networking, she said.

“The biggest mistake women make in networking is focusing and looking only for a mentor,” Tatum said. “What I really want women to focus on is getting that sponsor. A sponsor is someone who opens doors for you, advocates for you when you’re not in the room and helps you see opportunities around the corner. It is the difference maker when it comes to your career, opportunities and leveraging your network.”

How to get a sponsor? "You have to be visible and people have to see the value that you are bringing," she said.

She added, "You want to make sure you keep your ask really small. So when you reach out to a sponsor, you are coming to talk to them for 15-20 minutes about something specific that you know they can deliver. And then you follow up."

Top mistake women make in being negotiating their pay: Claire Wasserman, Ladies Get Paid


Ladies Get Paid founder Claire Wasserman, who hosts her own conference, "Get Money Get Paid," said she hears from thousands of women that they're not making what they “deserve.”

"You’re not going to make the money because you deserve it,” Claire Wasserman told GMA.

You have to make a compelling case about your accomplishments instead, she explained. "Tell the story in a way as if you were talking about a scene in the movie with high stakes and the most important part is to share your impact,” she said.

She went on, "When you make your case, it’s not just 'I worked hard.' Be as clear and detailed as possible to show what you did and how it affected the bottom of the line of the company."

Top mistake women make in building their brand: Jennifer Hyman, Rent the Runway co-Founder and CEO

As CEO and co-founder of the Rent the Runway, Jennifer Hyman changed the way women shop and think about clothes when she introduced her clothing rental business in 2009.

Despite the popularity of her beloved company and brand, you may not know who she is – and she is just fine with that.

"Often ... women feel like they need to put 100 percent of themselves out there and they need their personal lives to become their brands," Hyman told GMA.

Hyman offers this advice instead: "If I could serve as an example to a set of women, that you don’t have to make that choice if you don't want to. You can have a brand that is all about your company that’s inherently different and separate than the life you lead personally.”

Hyman, who participated in the GirlBoss Rally panel on "Building a Billion Dollar Empire," also noted don't be afraid to fail.

"The realness of failure, the realness of resilience of stepping up after those failures and putting one foot in front of the other and continuing to build something new is the most important human quality," she said. "It’s not just an important quality in business, but resilience is the most important quality in life.”

Top mistake women make in wellness: Hannah Bronfman, DJ, Founder HBFIT and Brand Ambassador

Hannah Bronfman has turned her passion for wellness into a career with HBFIT, amassing over 480,000 followers on her own Instagram page. Her followers tune in to Hannah’s latest ventures on all things heath, beauty and fitness.

“One of the top mistakes women make in their wellness routine is really trying to implement too much at once,” Bronfman told GMA.

Instead, Bronfman suggests, “I think it’s much easier to implement one thing at a time. You want to be able to understand how your body is reacting to these types of things, these types of changes. If you are doing it all at once you don’t know what’s particularly working or making you feel a certain way.”

She added, “The whole point of wellness and changing your routine is understanding how you feel.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Starting Monday you can not only order all your holiday presents on Amazon, but also get a full-sized, fresh Christmas tree delivered to your doorstep as well.

The tech site CNET and Good Morning America got a first look at the process.

“Everything is easy to order on Amazon, so I think it makes a lot of sense for people who are already doing a lot of shopping on Amazon,” Sharon Profis, the executive editor at CNET, told GMA.

At the CNET Smart Home in San Francisco, the tree from Amazon was delivered by a courier, and came in a box and wrapped in Twine.

Amazon said customers can order everything from a small, Charlie Brown-esque tree to one up 7 feet tall, and they will range in price from $20 to $110 depending on which type you choose.

The one delivered to the CNET office costs $110.

With free Prime shipping, consumers can expect to get their trees within three to seven business days, based on their location. The tree delivery package will also include care instructions, tree preservative and a biodegradable bag for the tree after the holidays are over.

"It looks really good," Profis commented. "In fact, I thought it was fake at first because it came out so fresh."

The trees come from local growers in North Carolina and Michigan, according to Amazon.

Natalie Sare, the owner of Santa's Tree Farm in Half Moon Bay, California, however, is a proponent of supporting your local Christmas tree farms each season.

Sare sells all their trees for just $65, but adds that there is another element that Amazon just can't deliver: the experience and tradition of going to a farm and picking out your tree each year.

"Parents say these are the memories their kids are going to remember," Sare told GMA. "Walking through the field, cutting down the tree together and putting it on the car."

Ultimately, the consumer's choice this holiday season may come down to the traditional joy of the experience, versus the one-click ease of home delivery.

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Nissan(TOKYO) -- Nissan Motor's chairman and another top executive have been arrested in Japan on fraud charges.

In a statement Monday, Nissan said an internal investigation found that for several years its chairman, Carlos Ghosn, and representative director, Greg Kelly, “have been reporting compensation amounts in the Tokyo Stock Exchange securities report that were less than the actual amount, in order to reduce the disclosed amount of Carlos Ghosn's compensation.”

“Also, in regards to Ghosn, numerous other significant acts of misconduct have been uncovered, such as personal use of company assets, and Kelly's deep involvement has also been confirmed,” the automaker added in its statement.

Both Ghosn and Kelly have since been fired.

In a news conference Monday in Tokyo, Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa said he feels disappointment and frustration.

“On behalf of the company, I would like to express my deep apologies,” Saikawa said, speaking through a translator.

“We need to really look back on what happened seriously and take immediate and fundamental countermeasures to solve this,” he added.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you're more committed to stuffing your shopping bag than your face, then check out all the stores open on Thanksgiving and Black Friday below.

Turkey day hours can get confusing with special doorbuster deals bleeding into Black Friday, so make sure to check your store's location to see if it will remain open between the two days.

Bass Pro Shops
Thanksgiving Day: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Belk
Thanksgiving Day: 4 p.m. - 1 a.m. Friday
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Best Buy
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 1 a.m. Friday
Black Friday: 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Big Lots
Thanksgiving Day: 7 a.m. - midnight
Black Friday: Opens 6 a.m.

Costco
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: 9 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Dick’s Sporting Goods
Thanksgiving Day: 6 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Home Depot
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: Opens 6 a.m.

JCPenney
Thanksgiving Day 2 p.m. through 10 p.m. on Black Friday

Kohl’s
Thanksgiving Day 5 p.m. through Black Friday until 1 p.m.

Kmart
Thanksgiving Day: 6 a.m. - midnight
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Macy’s
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Nordstrom
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Old Navy
Thanksgiving Day 3 p.m. through Black Friday at 10 p.m.

Sears
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Target
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Black Friday: Opens 7 a.m.

Walmart
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: Hours vary by location

Ulta
Thanksgiving Day: 6 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Victoria's Secret
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Monopoly is targeting millennials and actual millennials are sounding off.

On the box, Mr. Monopoly appears to be snapping a selfie while wearing a participation award and ear buds. The mascot is also holding some sort of coffee drink, arguably poking fun at millennials' love for lattes.

The board includes "Bike Share" spaces and no real estate available for purchase -- presumably due to the game's tagline: "No real estate. You can't afford it anyway."

Hasbro released this version of the board game earlier this year but, recently, Millennials have been expressing feelings via Twitter.

One posted, "Can you provide the URL for the Hasbro-official website featuring 'Monopoly for Millennials,' where you trash on my age demographic because baby boomers caused an economic catastrophe that rendered us financially impotent for a decade? Thanks!"

Another vented: "The rules are simple, you start with no money, you can’t afford anything, the board is on fire for some reason and everything is your fault."

Hasbro said in a statement that it created the game to poke fun at the oft-teased generation.

"We created Monopoly for Millennials to provide fans with a lighthearted game that allows Millennials to take a break from real life and laugh at the relatable experiences and labels that can sometimes be placed on them," the company said. "With many of us being Millennials ourselves, we understand the seemingly endless struggles and silly generalizations that young Millennials can face...Whether you are a lifestyle vlogger, emoji lover or you make your 'side hustle' selling vegan candles, Monopoly for Millennials is for you!"

Game pieces include a hashtag and emoji, but hopefuls on Twitter were rooting for a ripe avocado.

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Billionaire businessman and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg is donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, in an effort to help lower and middle income students gain access to college.

The donation, the largest contribution ever made to an education institution in the U.S., will be devoted exclusively to undergraduate financial aid, according to a joint press release by Johns Hopkins and Bloomberg's charitable organization, Bloomberg Philanthropies.

As a direct result of the endowment, Johns Hopkins will be able to permanently commit to "need-blind admissions," which will admit the highest-achieving students from all backgrounds, regardless of their ability to pay, according to the university.

In addition, the Baltimore-based school will be able to offer no-loan financial aid packages, reduce contributions for families who qualify for financial aid, provide "comprehensive student support," and increase the enrollment of Pell grant eligible students, which will "build a more socioeconomically diverse student body," Johns Hopkins said in a statement.

In an op-ed published in The New York Times Sunday, Bloomberg wrote that "no qualified high school student should ever be barred entrance to a college based on his or her family's bank account."

"Yet, it happens all the time," Bloomberg wrote.

Bloomberg wrote that high-achieving applicants who come from families with lower and middle incomes are "routinely denied seats" that are saved for "students whose families have deeper pockets."

"This hurts the son of a farmer in Nebraska as much as the daughter of a working mother in Detroit," he wrote, adding that "America is at its best" when people are rewarded "based on the quality of their work, not the size of their pocketbook."

Bloomberg, who wrote that his father never made more than $6,000 a year as a bookkeeper and he needed a National Defense student loan in order to attend college, graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1964 and made his first contribution of $5 to the school in 1965, according to the press release. In 2013, he pledged $350 million to the university toward cross-disciplinary education and financial aid, according to Forbes.

Before this donation, Bloomberg had already donated a total of $1.5 billion to the university.

The university is also aiming to address the issue of college "under-matching," in which high school students from middle and lower income backgrounds are not matched with competitive college choices but implementing an "extensive outreach and recruitment program to ensure that academically qualified students from middle and low income backgrounds understand that a world-class education ... is attainable and affordable."

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels said Bloomberg's donation "affirms his believe in the promise of this country and the power of accessible higher education," describing it as "unprecedented and transformative."

"Our university was founded in 1876 by a visionary $7 million gift from the Baltimore merchant Johns Hopkins. When it was announced, it was the largest gift of its kind. It created America’s first research university and changed the face of American higher education," Daniels said in a statement. "With today’s announcement of Mike Bloomberg’s $1.8 billion investment in financial aid, history has repeated itself."

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- Scientists from 60 countries voted in a historic event in Versailles, France on Friday to change the definition of the kilogram, basing it on electric currents rather than a single solid object.

The decision, made at the General Conference on Weights and Measurements, will retire the object known as "Le Grand K," a small cylindrical ingot made of platinum-iridium that has been used for more than 130 years to define a kilogram.

Le Grand K is stored at the International Bureau of Weights and Measurement in a vault, where it stands within three bell jars. Three keys are required to access it, and each one is held by a different person. Yet, despite its heavy security, the cylinder has begun to wear away, causing slight inaccuracies in the way we define and measure a kilogram.

The new definition will rely on the Planck constant, a fundamental constant used in quantum physics much like the speed of light is fundamental in Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.

"It describes the size of the packets of energy... that atoms and other particles use to absorb and emit energy," according to a statement from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

“The current kilogram mass exerts a specific amount of force in Earth’s gravity,” NIST said. “The revised definition replaces this determination of mechanical force with an electromagnetic measurement tied to the Planck constant and based on electrical current and voltage.”

Relying on a natural constant to define kilogram will pave the way for more accurate and precise work, particularly in the fields of science and technology, said Barry Inglis, director of the International Committee for Weights and Measurements, in a statement.

For the average person, however, the new definition shouldn't make much of a difference.

In addition to redefining the kilogram, the scientists voted on Friday to redefine three other base units from the International Systems of Units: the ampere, the kelvin and the mole.

The changes will be effective starting May 20, 2019.

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Hasbro(NEW YORK) -- Monopoly is targeting millennials and actual millennials are sounding off.

Hasbro released this version of the board game earlier this year, but recently, Gen Y has been expressing feelings via Twitter.

"Whoever has the most debt gets to go first," one tweeted.

@Hasbro Can you provide the URL for the Hasbro-official website featuring "Monopoly for Millennials," where you trash on my age demographic because baby boomers caused an economic catastrophe that rendered us financially impotent for a decade? Thanks! pic.twitter.com/wmm0WQwnld

— Steven Briggs (@TrnDaBeatAround) November 11, 2018

“Whoever has the most debt gets to go first” #MonopolyforMillennials pic.twitter.com/cmEz0N7v4g

— Kevin (@kwprime) November 15, 2018

"Let’s play a game of MILLENNIAL MONOPOLY," another wrote. "The rules are simple, you start with no money, you can’t afford anything, the board is on fire for some reason and everything is your fault."

Monopoly for Millennials is currently being sold in Walmart stores for $19.82, but is not listed on Hasbro's website.

Hasbro said in a statement that it created the game to poke fun at the oft-teased generation.

"We created Monopoly for Millennials to provide fans with a lighthearted game that allows Millennials to take a break from real life and laugh at the relatable experiences and labels that can sometimes be placed on them," the company said. "With many of us being Millennials ourselves, we understand the seemingly endless struggles and silly generalizations that young Millennials can face (and we can’t even!). Whether you are a lifestyle vlogger, emoji lover or you make your “side hustle” selling vegan candles, Monopoly for Millennials is for you!"

What should be on the board of #MillennialMonopoly ?
I say #CraftBeer and something that's #glutenfree pic.twitter.com/4IeMJbEFAV

— Chris Walker (@WalkerRadio678) November 13, 2018

#millennialmonopoly is $19.82 at Walmart. No millennial is gonna waste their money on a board game; we have other uses for our money: bills, debt, food, etc.

What are we gonna do anyways, play monopoly by ourselves in our parent’s basements? #wild pic.twitter.com/6EfymE6Duo

— Steve Juliff (@liljuliff) November 15, 2018

On the box, Mr. Monopoly appears to be snapping a selfie while wearing a participation award and ear buds. The mascot is also holding some sort of coffee drink, arguably poking fun at us millennials' love for lattes.

The board includes "Bike Share" spaces and no real estate available for purchase -- presumably due to the game's tagline: "No real estate. You can't afford it anyway."

So, I’m a #Millennial who can’t afford to save for a house or even rent somewhere because rent per month is more money than money I get per month and I’m single so no second income to help, but I also think #Monopolyformillennials is hilarious. #Monopoly #MillennialMonopoly

— Wavey Cowpar ~ (@WaveyCowpar) November 14, 2018

While some expressed offense, others found humor in the theme.

"What should be on the board of #MillennialMonopoly? I say #CraftBeer and something that's #glutenfree," one tweeted.

"Pass go and collect 200.......then give 180 back for bills"

Community Chest: "Make student loan payment of 300"

Chance: "Get pestered by adults for not having children and a house by 27, pay stress tax"

*Goes Bankrupt*: "Lol you think the games over?"#MillennialMonopoly pic.twitter.com/wyaueZooPs

— Steven (@SteveLo510) November 11, 2018

"Laughed so hard I fell off my dinosaur," another wrote in a Walmart review.

Game pieces include a hashtag and emoji, but hopefuls on Twitter were rooting for a ripe avocado.

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Facebook(NEW YORK) -- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg hunkered down and attempted to defend his leadership of the social media giant amid reporting that detailed how the company failed to effectively combat fake news and Russian political meddling.

The accusations were detailed in a year-long investigative report, "Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis" published by the New York Times on Wednesday.

One of the more damaging aspects of the Times report was that Facebook hired a Republican-linked D.C. consulting firm to plant negative stories about Facebook's competitors and critics. The move seemingly contradicts the company's public claims that it is transparent about how it handles fake stories on the platform.

Since the 2016 elections, Facebook has launched several "transparency" initiatives over the past year.

Announcing a campaign targeting accountability for ads in June, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said, "we are providing much more transparency than any other advertising platform, either online or offline."

Facebook fired the D.C. consulting firm, Definers Public Affairs, on Wednesday. Zuckerberg, in a conference call with reporters Thursday, repeatedly claimed he did not know that the company had been hired, trying to distinguish Facebook's culture with repeated references to "Washington, D.C., firms."

"I learned about this relationship when I read The New York Times piece yesterday. I looked into whether this was the kind of firm we should be working with. And we’re not working with them," Zuckerberg told reporters. "This type of firm might be normal in Washington but it’s not the kind of firm I want Facebook to be working with."

Zuckerberg also defended his key lieutenant, Sandberg.

"I want to be clear, I mentioned a couple of times I was not in the loop on some of these decisions, and Sheryl was also not involved and she learned about this the same time as I did," Zuckerberg said. "Overall Sheryl is doing great work for this company, she’s been a great partner to me and will continue to be a great partner to me.”

Sandberg commented on Facebook late Thursday, saying she "wanted to address some of the claims that have been made in the last 24 hours."

"On a number of issues -- including spotting and understanding the Russian interference we saw in the 2016 election -- Mark and I have said many times we were too slow. But to suggest that we weren’t interested in knowing the truth, or we wanted to hide what we knew, or that we tried to prevent investigations, is simply untrue," she wrote. "The allegations saying I personally stood in the way are also just plain wrong. This was an investigation of a foreign actor trying to interfere in our election. Nothing could be more important to me or to Facebook."

The company has repeatedly admitted it had not done enough to prevent the spread of fake news and political manipulation on its site, which executives repeated on Thursday through multiple press statements and on a call with reporters.

"But to suggest we weren't interested in knowing the truth, or that we wanted to hide what we knew is simply untrue," Zuckerberg said at the beginning of the call, which was originally meant to tout the company's progress cracking down on fake accounts, hate speech, terrorist propaganda, bullying and child pornography.

For example, Facebook removed over 1.6 billion fake accounts between April and September of this year, the company reported on Thursday.

Instead, the call turned into a crisis management session in which Zuckerberg and other executives defended their decisions amid a barrage of media questions related to the claims in the Times story and continuing problems with bad actors on the platform.

"There are lot of things I’d do differently in retrospect," Zuckerberg said about the company's actions regarding the election meddling.

Earlier in the day, Facebook fought back against the Times story.

"The story asserts that we knew about Russian activity as early as the spring of 2016 but were slow to investigate it at every turn. This is not true," Facebook wrote in a statement. "We also saw some new behavior when [Russia-linked group] APT28-related accounts, under the banner of DC Leaks, created fake personas that were used to seed stolen information to journalists. We shut these accounts down for violating our policies.'"

When asked if Facebook monitors the messages of journalists on its platform, Zuckerberg replied, "Absolutely not."

Zuckerberg effectively said he would not step down as chairman of his board of directors when asked specifically by reporters. Many corporate governance experts said it's an inherent conflict of interest for a CEO to also be chairman.

"I don’t think that specific proposal is the right way to go," he said, when asked if he'd give up the chairman role.

Activist investors had already been pushing for Zuckerberg to step down as chair.

"I think The New York Times reporting illustrates exactly why we are recommending an independent board chair. The fact that they kept the board in the dark for so long shows us that an independent board chair is necessary," Jonas Kron, whose company Trillium Investments owns 53,000 shares of Facebook, told ABC News. "We knew that already, but the report should remove any lingering doubts."

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